Category Archives: Study Days

Bruxelles et le siège

Training in Lewisham on November 12 — Book here.

“We believe that we do well what we do often.” – Caroline Daelemans

Drs Caroline Daelemas and Sara Derisbourg

Contact Hōpital Erasme Clinique du Siège on Tel 00 32 2 5553325, or siege.clini-obs @ erasme.ulb.ac.be.

This month I visited Hōpital Erasme, in Brussels, Belgium. Led by Lead Obstetrician Caroline Daelemans, Erasme began to offer a dedicated Breech Clinic in December 2015. Much of the organisation and development of the clinic has been done by Dr Sara Derisbourg, who continues to research the impact of instituting a dedicated breech service.

I came to Brussels to provide our usual physiological breech study day. The breech team has transitioned to using physiological methods, including upright maternal positions (Louwen et al 2016), after attending training in Norwich in 2017. They now needed the rest of the team to understand the philosophy behind this approach. But the day began with Caroline describing the impact of instituting a dedicated Breech Clinic, and this was particularly exciting for me.

Josephine and Thiago talk about their experience of Ulysse’s breech birth at Erasme

My own research concerning the development of breech competence and expertise, and the recovery of these skills within a service, indicates that developing a core team with significant experience is the most effective method of safely offering a vaginal breech birth service (Walker et al 2016). This skilled and experienced core is more important than the ‘selection criteria’ that are used to predict the likelihood of a good outcome (but in fact are not very predictive). Skill and experience facilitate good outcomes and enable other colleagues to develop competence (Walker et al 2018). The Erasme team even encourage other health care professionals to come with their clients and attend them in labour with their support, to encourage the growth of breech skills.

The need for new ways of organising care has been emphasised in an on-line survey of Dutch gynaecologists just published by Post et al (2018, Does vaginal breech delivery have a future despite low volumes for training?): “Potential suggested alterations in organization are designated gynecologists within one centre, designated teams within one region or centralizing breech birth to hospitals with a regional referral status. Training should then be offered to residents within these settings to make the experience as wide spread as possible.”

Daphne Lagrou of Médecins Sans Frontières demonstrates shoulder press

Daelemans and Derisbourg began with a small team of 5 people. This has gradually expanded and now includes eight members who together provide 24/7 cover for all breech births within the hospital. Women with a breech presentation are referred by colleagues and increasingly by other women. The environment at Erasme is ideal because the hospital has a very positive approach to physiological birth in general, and a 15% overall caesarean section rate in 2017. This compares to 20.2% in Brussels and much higher in many places globally.

Practising collaborative manoeuvres for resolving head extension at the inlet of the pelvis (elevate & rotate)

What has the Breech Clinic changed? Before the introduction of the clinic, the planned vaginal breech birth rate was 7.19%, and in just a few years this has climbed to 42.7% of all breech presentations. Neonatal outcomes have remained stable. Actual vaginal breech births have climbed from 4.2% to 35.96% of all breech presentations within the hospital. The success rate for planned vaginal breech birth is 76.3%, which suggests that within experienced teams, the emergency caesarean section rate is also reduced. (The RCOG guideline suggests about 40% of planned breech births end in CS.)

All of this is very impressive. The message is clear: a physiological approach and an organised care pathway, including a breech clinic and experienced on-call team, can reduce the caesarean section rate significantly without negatively impacting neonatal outcomes. We should all look out for Derisbourg’s papers when they are published.

If you are a woman seeking support for a physiological breech birth, or a health care professional looking to refer a woman to the breech clinic, they can be contacted on Tel 00 32 2 5553325, or siege.clini-obs @ erasme.ulb.ac.be. Caroline Daelemans will be teaching with me in Lewisham, London, on 12 November.

— Shawn

Building confidence and changing practice through participation on training days

Emma Spillane

Emma Spillane, Training Co-ordinator at the Breech Birth Network, has attended six breech births in the last six months in an NHS hospital. Rebuilding breech skill is possible, guided by evidence about how breech competence develops. Emma writes about how she gained confidence in teaching and attending physiological breech births by assisting at Physiological Breech Birth study days.

In January 2017 I attended a Physiological Breech Birth study day in Norwich by Dr Shawn Walker and Dr Anke Reitter.  Breech birth had always interested me from my first breech birth as a newly qualified midwife.  I didn’t understand the physiology of breech birth at this time, it had always been taught as something abnormal, an obstetric emergency.  I could never understand though, how breech birth could be so abnormal if babies were on occasion born like this.  My interest had been piqued, and so a few years later, and a few more breech births later, I found myself on the study day to develop my knowledge and skills in vaginal breech birth.

The study day taught me the tools required for supporting women to have a physiological breech birth and to resolve possible complications whilst supporting physiology.  Following the training I went and introduced myself to Shawn and told her of my interest in breech birth, I felt so inspired to start a breech birth service within the trust I work.  On my return to work I started putting plans in place to develop a service within the trust.  Shawn contacted me  a few days later and invited me to help teach the hands on clinical skills on her next Physiological Breech Birth training day in South Wales.  I jumped at the chance to attend and found it so useful to listen to the day again and then help with the hands on teaching.  It helped to embed what I had already learnt previously and give me the confidence to teach the skills within my own trust.

I started talking about breech, a lot!  Shawn continued to invite me to help on training days and with each one my confidence grew. I started viewing the videos differently. Instead of looking for what was ‘normal’ and ‘abnormal’ I started analysing them with a deeper understanding of the physiology.  Shawn also encouraged me to start teaching parts of the presentation. Admittedly I was more than a little ropey to begin with but with Shawn’s nurturing and encouragement and the more I learnt from each training day, each time I attended my confidence grew.  Eventually I was able to transfer this new knowledge, understanding and confidence into practice.  I was asked to attend a breech birth!

I supported a woman with a physiological breech birth, along with a consultant obstetrician colleague and one other midwife.  An arm complication occurred with the birth, and I was able to resolve using the manoeuvres I had learnt and taught on the course. The baby was born in good condition, and I felt relieved and elated!  I immediately contacted Shawn to tell her about the birth but it had also sparked an interest in the consultant obstetrician who had attended. We debriefed from the birth and I spoke about the Breech Birth Network and the training it offers.  I took the opportunity to ask if my obstetric colleague would like to be the lead consultant in my quest to set up a breech birth service, to which they agreed.  It had taken me nine months – the length of a full term pregnancy – from when I first attended the training until this physiological breech birth. It was the birth of an exciting change in knowledge and culture.

Claire Reading, Emma Spillane and Shawn Walker

Attending training days has not only helped to embed my own learning but it has given me the skills and confidence to set up a service within the trust I work, support women who choose to have a vaginal breech birth and support colleagues to facilitate breech births themselves.  I have found repeating the information and skills has been the key to my learning and enabling change within practice. It has given me the confidence to attend births and increased the number of breech births within the trust by instilling confidence in others.  If you would like to build your confidence in vaginal breech birth, develop a service within your trust and teach others I highly recommend coming along and helping at future training days. You can view a list of upcoming opportunities to help deliver training here. Please let us know by getting in contact via email or the contact form.

Emma

Research indicates that providing teaching is an important part of the development of breech expertise. Read more: Expertise in physiological breech birth: A mixed-methods study

Breech in Belfast

Consultant Obstetricians Niamh McCabe and Janitha Costa, and Breech Specialist Midwife Jacqui Simpson

The Breech Birth Network visited Belfast this weekend. Dr Anke Reitter FRCOG of the Krankenhaus Sachsenhausen and I taught a day-long physiological breech study day at the Royal Victoria Hospital for over 40 obstetricians and midwives.

The day was organised by Consultant Obstetricians Janitha Costa and Niamh McCabe, enthusiastic upright physiological breech practitioners, and Senior Registrar Shaun McGowan. The team have recently published outcomes associated with their breech clinic (Hickland et al 2017 and Costa 2014).

Our study day increasingly emphasises pattern recognition and decision-making through the use of real breech birth videos, especially videos of complicated births. We watch, deliberate and critique – with compassionate understanding, respect and humble appreciation. These brave health professionals and women have allowed themselves to be vulnerable and exposed in order that others may learn, and we are very grateful.

We have also moved away from using heavy and expensive simulation models and rely instead on doll and pelvis models. These enable us to see what is happening from all angles and embed the theory of the manoeuvres we are teaching. We operate on a see one (the theoretical presentation), do one (hands-on with one of the instructors), teach one (of your colleagues) model. This helps build confidence to carry on teaching the techniques in the local setting.

Our preferred models (it’s a great idea to have some on hand if you are organising a study day or implementing this training in your local setting) are:

Fetal Doll Model; and

Cloth Pelvic Model; or

Female Pelvis Model

Final announcement: Blogging has resumed because … I submitted my PhD a couple weeks ago! Hurrah!

Shawn

Krankenhaus Sachsenhausen is also on Facebook!

Visca les natges! Barcelona breech training

(See the Catalan version of this article below …)

This week (21-22 March 2017), the Breech Birth Network was in the beautiful city of Barcelona, at the invitation of the obstetricians and midwives of Hospital Sant Pau. Our team expanded for the occasion! Midwife Maria Segura translated all of our teaching slides into Catalan. And Cardiff-based midwife Carmen Rubio ensured everyone had an opportunity to receive hands-on help when practising manoeuvres to assist women birthing in upright positions.

I love studying and teaching physiological breech birth most because when a health professional learns how breech works, they learn how all birth works. Despite its apparent applicability for only a small proportion of the total population, skill in the art of facilitating breech birth resonates throughout a professional’s entire birth practice, their collaborative work with colleagues and within institutions.

Our experience in Barcelona made this clear. Hospital Sant Pau is in a period of transition, trying to increase the rates of normal birth. Breech birth is a part of that, but midwives are also working to establish the first midwifery-led birth centre in Catalunya. The hospital has recently established a new guideline enabling obstetricians to support physiological breech birth, including women who choose to birth without an epidural. To enable women to have a choice of pain relief for physiological birth without epidural, the hospital team are considering offering nitrous oxide (Entonox) for the first time. And for some of those attending this week’s training, our videos were their first exposure to women birthing in a kneeling position. One obstetrician suggested they could prepare for the change in breech practice by facilitating kneeling positions for cephalic births!

Dr Arianna Bonato, one of the external OB-GYNs attending the training, told me she feels that a breech birth is the most beautiful birth to see, because the physiology is so visible. I agree! This visibility makes possible learning about physiological birth in general within the microcosm of breech.

The way that a neurologically intact baby assists his own birth, the intuitive movements of a mother who feels safe and uninhibited, and the consequences of interventions in the mother-baby dance, to facilitate or disrupt, are all much more exposed. As Carmen Rubio reminded me, breech births demand calm wisdom in the birthing space like no other.

“Give it a wiggle” / “Donar una sacsejada” !

I have no doubt Hospital Sant Pau’s open-minded and forward-thinking approach will attract many more women to birth in this hospital, and that their midwifery unit will also thrive when it is opened. A blessing for the women of Barcelona. I look forward to staying in touch and learning from their experience of implementing these new practices!

Thank you to Consultant Obstetrician Ma Carmen Medina Mallen, and Maria Segura, for their work in organising the Breech Birth Network training this week. Hospital Sant Pau will be auditing their outcomes for term breech presentation over the next year, as part of our international evaluation of Physiological Breech Birth training.

— Shawn

Elevate & Rotate from Shawn Walker on Vimeo.


Many thanks to midwives Carmen Rubio and Maria Segura for the translation of this blog into Catalan!

Aquesta setmana (21-22 de Març 2017), la Xarxa pel Part de Natges va estar a la bonica Ciutat de Barcelona, com a invitació dels ginecòlegs i llevadores de l’Hospital de Sant Pau. El nostre equip va créixer per l’ocasió! La llevadora Maria Segura va traduir totes les diapositives de la sessió al català i la llevadora Carmen Rubio, amb seu a Cardiff, va garantir que tothom pogués tenir l’oportunitat de rebre ajuda en la pràctica de les maniobres per assistir les dones que vulguin donar a llum en posicions verticals.

Hospital Sant Pau

M’agrada estudiar i ensenyar el part de natges de manera fisiològica, sobretot, perquè quan els professionals aprenen el funcionament d’aquest, també ho fan sobre els fonaments de donar a llum. Encara que la seva aparent aplicació sigui per una petita proporció de la població, l’habilitat en l’art de facilitar els naixements de natges ressona a través de tota la pràctica professional, així com a la feina de col·laboració entre companys i al conjunt de les seves institucions.

La nostra experiència a Barcelona ho va deixar ben clar. L’Hospital està a un període de transició, intentant incrementar les xifres del part natural. El part de natges forma part d’això, però les llevadores, a més, estan treballant en la línia de crear la primera casa de naixements pública a Catalunya. L’Hospital ha establert recentment un nou protocol que permet als obstetres reconsiderar el part de natges de forma fisiològica, incloent-hi la voluntat de les dones que vulguin donar a llum sense epidural. A més, l’equip de l’Hospital està en vies d’introduir l’Òxid Nitrós (Entonox) per primera vegada, com un altre recurs d’analgèsia per les usuàries de part. Per alguns dels participants a la formació, va ser la seva primera vegada en veure, a través dels vídeos, a dones donant a llum en posició vertical. Una de les ginecòlogues va suggerir que es podrien preparar pel canvi en la pràctica de l’atenció al part facilitant més activament la posició vertical als naixements dels nadons que es troben en presentació cefàlica.

La Dr. Arianna B. una de les obstetres/ginecòlogues que va atendre la formació, em va dir que sentia que el naixement de natges és molt bonic d’observar, perquè en ell es pot veure clarament la fisiologia del part. I estic d’acord! Aquesta claredat és la que ha permès aprendre del part fisiològic en general des del microcosmos de les natges.

La forma en què un nadó neurològicament sa assisteix el seu propi naixement, els moviments que intuïtivament fa la mare quan se sent segura i desinhibida, i quines són les conseqüències de facilitar o interrompre la dansa entre mare i fill són molt clarament exposades. Com la Carmen Rubio em va recordar, el part de natges demana com cap altre, la saviesa calmada de l’espai en el qual es dóna a llum.

No tinc cap dubte que la ment oberta i de pensament avançat de l’Hospital de Sant Pau atraurà moltes més dones a aquest Hospital i que la seva Casa de Naixements serà també popular quan l’obrin. Una benedicció per les dones de Barcelona. Estic desitjant estar en contacte i aprendre de l’experiència en la implementació d’aquestes noves pràctiques.

Moltes gràcies als membres de l’equip obstètric, la Ma Carmen Medina Mallen i a Maria Segura, pel seu esforç organitzant la formació de la Xarxa pel Part de Natges. L’Hospital de Sant Pau auditarà durant l’any vinent els resultats dels parts en presentació de natges com a part de la nostra avaluació internacional respecte la formació del Naixement Fisiològic de Natges.

— Shawn, Carmen & Maria

Wales and the breech

Cardiff midwife Carmen Rubio spots the nalgas!

This week, we’ve been doing our breech thing in Wales. First Powys, at the Royal Welsh Showground in Builth Wells, and then on to Aberystwyth to deliver our RCM-approved Physiological Breech Birth study day. I had some help to deliver the training in Powys from a new member of the Breech Birth Network team: Emma Spillane, Lead Midwife for the Carmen Suite Birth Centre of St. George’s, London. Emma brings both breech and NHS leadership experience to the team and is a fantastic skills educator. Welcome, Emma!

Emma Spillane, Shawn Walker & Shelly Jones at the Royal Welsh Showground (early in the morning …)

Midwifery in Wales is a different kettle of fish to much of the rest of the UK. Powys has no obstetric unit, and care is entirely midwifery-led for women at low and moderate risk. Births take place at home or at a midwifery-led unit, unless the women travel to an obstetric centre out of choice or by referral. Improving skills to facilitate undiagnosed breech births, in settings where the transfer time may be well over an hour, was the priority for these midwives. The focus of our training is on using physiological principles (#giveitawiggle). But we also explored the potential for collaborative working across boundaries to provide continuity for women requesting a breech birth. Thank you to Lead Midwife Shelly Jones of the Powys Teaching Health Board for organising the day!

Dr Liliana Docan giving instruction on manoeuvres

Aberystwyth is an obstetric unit, but at 600 births per year also maintains close ties with larger units nearby, especially Carmarthen. The guidelines around breech and ECV are currently being reviewed in this area, and the hope is that future guidelines will include more recent evidence around 1) support for informed choice of breech birth; 2) use of upright birthing positions; and 3) increased involvement of midwives in both physiological breech and ECV practice. A visible care pathway is needed in this sparsely populated area, where providing the full spectrum of care relies on close collaborative working between smaller and larger units. Thank you to Senior Midwife Rucha Eldridge of Bronglais Hospital/Ysbyty Bronglais for organising the study day! And thank you to Aber obstetrician Liliana Docan and clinical skills educator Nicole Gajlikowska for your enthusiasm and help with hands-on practice of upright manoeuvres.

Given the level of interest and the number of attendees from different areas of Wales and the English border, we expect Breech Birth Network will be returning soon. If you have breech experience and would like to become involved in teaching and leading change for breech within Wales, we would love to hear from you! We can lend our experience and fully evaluated course materials to your efforts. You can contact us using the form below.

Shawn

Aberystwyth

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