I’m honored to be asked to be the guest writer this week on breech.  Shawn Walker is an international inspiration to those doing breech work around the world in various settings providing tools for breech birth to be safer and more accessible.

breech glassMy journey to breech started with the breech homebirth of my daughter, Nilaya, who is now 12 years old.  I was a student midwife just starting to catch babies here in the U.S. and had my first two head down babies steeped in a culture of home birth where twins and breech were normal. The choice to birth my third baby breech at home was not difficult.  I did not have to fight for it.  I just did it.   It was through this birth that I became invested in understanding and preserving this part of the craft of midwifery.  

Getting experience and quality training in breech has been a challenge.  I’ve had to seek out workshops and conferences from across the United States, take online international courses, and work to understand the mechanics of knowing normal vaginal breech birth.    Even though I am an instructor at our local midwifery school and have developed the curriculum here for breech birth, I still have limited hands-on experience that is slowly growing through the years.  As a Spinning Babies Approved Trainer, I get many referrals for breech parents and help them to navigate breech late in pregnancy through counseling, bodywork, and midwifery skills.  It is amazing what skills one picks up with their hands from seeing so many families and palpating so many breech presentations. Being able to have breech immersion of any sort can help keep the knowledge and skills alive.  

We are at a crossroads here in the U.S. for breech where in state after state, midwives are being limited by laws for attending breech and have not had a bar set for what breech birth competency looks like.  We might have a small list of skills, but with breech complications, we know that the refined skills can make a difference in outcomes.  If we have the ability to show experience, understanding, and investment in training, we might set a different course for breech, and midwives might actually set the bar for competency and have influence on other professions.  I am interested in how we can provide a more thorough understanding of what Shawn Walker deems “Respecting the Mechanisms” and “Restoring the Mechanisms” of breech.  In this way, I also believe that we can shift the paradigm of “No normal breech” to “Know normal breech.”  The international breech community, in how it is detailing the mechanisms of breech birth, can actually be a model to those doing vertex deliveries!  One of the reasons for a higher cesarean rate here in the U.S. is fear of a shoulder dystocia  In understanding the mechanisms of normal and restoring these mechanisms at all levels of the pelvis could reduce interventions and improve outcomes.  There is value for all births in utilizing gravity and mobility to increase diameters of the pelvis or to safely reduce fetal diameters when presented WITH complications.   Respecting that the reflexes of a baby being born are also part of the mechanisms of normal birth may not be seen with a vertex baby, but we know that babies help themselves to be born.     

As the international breech community discusses developing breech birth centers and (re)teaching breech, I’ve worked on how I can document my own road to competency and compiled these ideas in the format of the student paperwork for the North American Registry of Midwives (NARM).  I naively thought I would just submit them for review, but the interest of a larger community has to also be there.  There must be more conversations in the community over how such documentation can be useful and how to avoid potential pitfalls of its use.  I have called it “Breech Competency Documentation” so that it provides a way for birth workers to document skill acquisition as well as experience.  One could choose to keep the documentation on file for themselves or even to be part of a larger program.  

I am sharing below three out of four documents I created that are works in progress and open for suggestions.  I want to create a community conversation and am posting these publicly as birth workers in various countries have asked me for such information which I find valuable.  As we gain more knowledge about breech, these skills checklists can be updated to reflect the current knowledge.  

The first document, which is modeled after the NARM skills list, is a compilation of the current skills being developed in the international breech community.  I acknowledge that some Qualified Breech Preceptors may practice differently, but these skills are about developing  a baseline for understanding upright normal breech and upright breech complications.  

The second document, which is modeled after the NARM requirements for becoming a Certified Professional Midwife (CPM), outlines experience for assisting and being a primary student under observation of a Qualified Breech Preceptor.  I originally considered requiring higher numbers of birth / experiences / skills on these lists, but I then realized that it as going to be quite difficult to acquire those numbers of breech deliveries because of the overall low percentage of babies who are breech at term.   I decided that we must focus on quality of skills and of each birth attended and included the ability to use retrospective births that can be debriefed and reviewed with the preceptor.

The second document, which is modeled after the NARM skills list, is a compilation of the current skills being developed in the international breech community.  I broke down the skill categories starting with breech pregnancy, normal vaginal breech birth, complications at the different levels of the pelvis, and small section of postpartum care.   

The third document is for the student / midwife to list retrospective births they may have had and document the process of review with a Qualified Breech Preceptor.  This allows previous births to be able to be integrated and reframed within this format.

The fourth document I have started but not posted and it is pivotal in the overall conversation of Breech Competency Documentation regarding who would or would not qualify as a Qualified Breech Preceptor.  Through this documentation I believe we must point to the Delphi Study and its baseline as being above 20 breech births.  However, attending a certain number of births without any complication may not lead to more competence than someone who has had fewer births but had to resolve complications.  As I was creating this paperwork as a student of breech birth, I questioned whether it should be a document developed in more detail between preceptors and experts.  




I want to thank all of the people who helped me review the skills list for Breech Competency Documentation including Gail Tully, Diane Goslin, Shawn Walker, and Vickii Gervais.  I also want to thank Rindi Cullen-Martin for helping me with formatting and making the changes.  Both of us as breech mothers have an investment in continuing this work.  This work has also been influenced by the international breech community including Jane Evans, Mary Cronk, Anke Reitter, Frank Louwen, Maggie Banks, Anne Frye, Betty-Anne Daviss, Mary Cooper, Peter J. O’Neill, Andrew Bisits, Stuart Fischebein, and many others.

  Nicole Morales, LM CPM is a midwife with a home birth practice in San Diego, California.  She is a Spinning Babies Approved Trainer, an instructor at Nizhoni Institute of Midwifery and a Certified Birthing From Within Mentor.  She and other breech mothers have worked on the website breechbirthsd.com to compile information for families and providers navigating breech pregnancy and birth. 

Building confidence and changing practice through participation on training days

Emma Spillane

Emma Spillane, Training Co-ordinator at the Breech Birth Network, has attended six breech births in the last six months in an NHS hospital. Rebuilding breech skill is possible, guided by evidence about how breech competence develops. Emma writes about how she gained confidence in teaching and attending physiological breech births by assisting at Physiological Breech Birth study days.

In January 2017 I attended a Physiological Breech Birth study day in Norwich by Dr Shawn Walker and Dr Anke Reitter.  Breech birth had always interested me from my first breech birth as a newly qualified midwife.  I didn’t understand the physiology of breech birth at this time, it had always been taught as something abnormal, an obstetric emergency.  I could never understand though, how breech birth could be so abnormal if babies were on occasion born like this.  My interest had been piqued, and so a few years later, and a few more breech births later, I found myself on the study day to develop my knowledge and skills in vaginal breech birth.

The study day taught me the tools required for supporting women to have a physiological breech birth and to resolve possible complications whilst supporting physiology.  Following the training I went and introduced myself to Shawn and told her of my interest in breech birth, I felt so inspired to start a breech birth service within the trust I work.  On my return to work I started putting plans in place to develop a service within the trust.  Shawn contacted me  a few days later and invited me to help teach the hands on clinical skills on her next Physiological Breech Birth training day in South Wales.  I jumped at the chance to attend and found it so useful to listen to the day again and then help with the hands on teaching.  It helped to embed what I had already learnt previously and give me the confidence to teach the skills within my own trust.

I started talking about breech, a lot!  Shawn continued to invite me to help on training days and with each one my confidence grew. I started viewing the videos differently. Instead of looking for what was ‘normal’ and ‘abnormal’ I started analysing them with a deeper understanding of the physiology.  Shawn also encouraged me to start teaching parts of the presentation. Admittedly I was more than a little ropey to begin with but with Shawn’s nurturing and encouragement and the more I learnt from each training day, each time I attended my confidence grew.  Eventually I was able to transfer this new knowledge, understanding and confidence into practice.  I was asked to attend a breech birth!

I supported a woman with a physiological breech birth, along with a consultant obstetrician colleague and one other midwife.  An arm complication occurred with the birth, and I was able to resolve using the manoeuvres I had learnt and taught on the course. The baby was born in good condition, and I felt relieved and elated!  I immediately contacted Shawn to tell her about the birth but it had also sparked an interest in the consultant obstetrician who had attended. We debriefed from the birth and I spoke about the Breech Birth Network and the training it offers.  I took the opportunity to ask if my obstetric colleague would like to be the lead consultant in my quest to set up a breech birth service, to which they agreed.  It had taken me nine months – the length of a full term pregnancy – from when I first attended the training until this physiological breech birth. It was the birth of an exciting change in knowledge and culture.

Claire Reading, Emma Spillane and Shawn Walker

Attending training days has not only helped to embed my own learning but it has given me the skills and confidence to set up a service within the trust I work, support women who choose to have a vaginal breech birth and support colleagues to facilitate breech births themselves.  I have found repeating the information and skills has been the key to my learning and enabling change within practice. It has given me the confidence to attend births and increased the number of breech births within the trust by instilling confidence in others.  If you would like to build your confidence in vaginal breech birth, develop a service within your trust and teach others I highly recommend coming along and helping at future training days. Please let us know by getting in contact via email or the contact form.


Research indicates that providing teaching is an important part of the development of breech expertise. Read more: Expertise in physiological breech birth: A mixed-methods study

What is the evidence for shoulder press / Frank’s Nudge?

Learning shoulder press in Montreal with Isabelle Brabant

As physiological breech practice gains acceptance, guidelines are changing to reflect this change in practice. One of the questions those updating guidelines often ask is: What is the evidence? For example, what is the evidence for the shoulder press manoeuvre we teach in Physiological Breech Birth study days?

To answer this question, we have to consider what level of evidence underpins breech practice in general. To my knowledge, no breech manoeuvres have been tested in randomised controlled trials. A recent Cochrane Review looked at ‘Quick versus standard delivery’ for breech babies and found no reliable studies to inform practice.

Image from Louwen et al 2017, Does breech delivery in an upright position instead of on the back improve outcomes and avoid caesareans? Open Access, click on image for full report. Artwork by Chloe Aubert

Observational studies that contain clear descriptions of the methods of management used in that setting reported alongside perinatal outcomes contain one form of evidence. A problem with observational studies is that even when ‘classical methods’ are reported, the meaning of that expression varies between settings. So studies from Canada, for example, are not necessarily generalizable to settings in the UK because standard practice varies between the two continents. A notable exception is the study of outcomes associated with upright breech birth reported by the Frankfurt team (Louwen et al 2017), in which a very clear description of the ‘Frank’s Nudge’ manoeuvre is provided, alongside excellent perinatal outcomes associated with upright maternal positions.

Another type of evidence is the support of a ‘responsible body of similar professionals.’ This is related to the Bolam test for clinical negligence in English tort law (Bolam v. Friern Hospital Management Committee), which holds that, “there is no breach of standard of care if a responsible body of similar professionals support the practice that caused the injury, even if the practice was not the standard of care.” In our research with 13 obstetricians and 13 midwives who had attended a self-reported average of 135 breech births each (Walker et al 2016), 73% of those participating agreed or strongly agreed that health professionals attending upright breech births should be competent to assist by:

  • sub-clavicular pressure and bringing the shoulders forward to flex an extended head; and
  • pressure in the sub-clavicular space, triggering the head to flex.

Additionally, 86% agreed or strongly agreed that an essential skill was:

  • moving infant’s body to mum’s body, so that infant’s body follows the curve of the woman’s sacrum

This research avoided the use of names such as ‘shoulder press’ and ‘Frank’s Nudge’ in favour of descriptions because not everyone uses the same terms, or refers to the same actions even if they do.

Evidence for manoeuvres also comes from evaluations of training programmes, both breech-specific and obstetrics emergencies courses. In our review of the effectiveness of vaginal breech birth training strategies (Walker et al 2017a), we found no published studies demonstrating an association between any training strategy and improvement in perinatal outcomes. The evidence base for the PROMPT training programme, widely used in the UK, comes from a study that did demonstrate an association with training and a subsequent reduction in low 5-minute Apgar scores and HIE (Draycott et al 2006). But that study questionably excluded outcomes for breech births, and because of this the breech methods in PROMPT cannot be said to be evidence-based, although the programme’s overall approach of multi-disciplinary working and clear communication remains important.

Most obstetrics emergencies training programmes have been evaluated at the level of change in confidence and/or knowledge. Our Physiological Breech Birth training programme, which includes shoulder press, has also been evaluated at this level in published research and demonstrated good results (Walker et al 2017b).

Finally we have the most recent RCOG guideline (Impey et al 2017), which states: “The choice of manoeuvres used, if required to assist with delivery of the breech, should depend on the individual experience/preference of the attending doctor or midwife.”

— Shawn

Birth Rites collection launch at King’s

Next Thursday evening (25/1/18), King’s College London will host an opening night gathering to celebrate the launch of the Birth Rites collection installation throughout the the Guy’s campus. The event is free and open to the public, but you have to book.

“And I assure you that it was a very startling thing for me to hear a woman describing her feelings as she gave birth in the same words used by Bucke to describe cosmic consciousness or by Huxley to describe the mystic experience in all cultures and eras or by Ghiselin to describe the creative process or by Suzuki to describe the Zen satori experience.” – Abraham Maslow, describing ‘peak experiences’

“Terese crowning in ecstatic childbirth” from Ina May Gaskin’s book ‘Ina May’s guide to childbirth’ Hermione Wiltshire, 2008,  black and white photograph. Birth Rites Collection.

Birth Rites is the first and only collection of contemporary art dedicated to the subject of childbirth. Works in the collection explore the intersection of emotional and technological experience of birth in 21st century culture.

Artist book ‘Cock’s Comb’ screen printed by Helen Knowles, bound by Helen Johnson and made in collaboration with teenage parents at Salford Women’s Centre. The book explored the teenage mothers language they used for the body and their experiences of childbirth by incorporating their drawings and writings, it also made reference to ‘The midwives Book’ written by Jane Sharpe in 1734, the first English midwifery text written by a woman. Detail of artist book ‘Cock’s Comb’ screen printed by Helen Knowles, bound by Helen Johnson and made in collaboration with teenage parents at Salford Women’s Centre.

The images are powerful and challenging, especially for those who are not used to seeing women’s faces and bodies transformed by the work of labour and birth. They provoke, and some are uncomfortable, controversial.

‘Yoga positions for Birth’ 2008 by Hermione Wiltshire. Photographic installation. Birth Rites Collection.

But this is the purpose of art. Private, hidden moments are public for a flash. And we’d love to hear your thoughts about it. If you are near London next Thursday, please do join us.

— Shawn

Can “mothering” be gender-neutral?

My work requires me to be able to speak to many audiences: midwives, obstetricians, paramedics, policy makers, birthing families. Increasingly working across cultural boundaries constantly challenges me to check my assumptions, to learn new ways of communicating. I don’t always get things right. I was recently asked by an education leader in an organisation I had worked with if I would consider eliminating gendered pronouns in my teaching videos. The request was warm, genuine and respectful. And it reflects the policy emerging within some maternity care professional organisations, particularly throughout North America.

I struggled with what I perceived to be a request to eliminate woman and mother in favour of gender-neutral language, and this blog is my attempt to be open and honest about this struggle. Some of my reactions are personal. I am a white cis-female who has given birth and raised my children as their mother. I have been privileged to have a good education and financial security. But my name is Shawn, and about once a week someone asks me how I ended up with a guy’s name, or addresses me via e-mail as Mr Walker, or expresses surprise that I appear to be a woman. It’s annoying, but I get it.

I’ve been using Ms, even when I have to write it in as an option, since I was a teenager. I had to do this yesterday, and the 1970’s have been over for at least 30 years. I have never changed my surname, even after marriage. And now that I know it’s a thing, would probably prefer that e-mailers use Mx rather than assume Mr. Although I have mothered four children (ages 6-16) who are growing up in Norwich, I live mostly 2 hours away in London and travel a lot for work. I am frequently asked who looks after my children when I am gone. No one ever asks their fathers, who are their main carers, when they travel for work. I am also American, but my accent has drifted across the Atlantic enough to be not quite English to English ears and quite English to non-English people. When I visit my parents in the US, people who don’t know me well refer to me as The English Lady. Thankfully, no one has ever referred to me as The English Pregnant Patient. I am enormously privileged and secure by chance and circumstance, but I also find myself in-between at times.

So why does gender neutral language in maternity care not feel obviously right to me? Certainly, referring to a group attending antenatal classes as parents rather than mums and dads feels right, because many combinations of parents make up families these days. But I feel a sense of loss as I contemplate dropping women and/or mothers completely from the way I teach and talk about my work.

Certainly, some of it is cultural. I am aware of advocacy for recognition of non-binary sex, gender and sexuality in the UK, and many things have changed for the better. But in general the midwifery profession still sees itself collectively as aspiring to woman-centred care, certainly in the UK and internationally if the collaborative Lancet Series in Midwifery is anything to go by. The etymology of “midwife” is “with woman.” Midwifery has a natural affinity with feminism in its aspirations to reduce inequalities, and this inherently involves recognising women as a class of people who are exposed to unequal and sometimes actively oppressive cultural and health care dynamics. In 2015, Glosswitch suggested, “Gender-neutral language around reproduction creates the illusion of dismantling a hierarchy – when what you really end up doing is ignoring it.” Elephant Circle, responding to MANA’s decision to shift to gender-inclusive language, made it clear that they are “committed to promoting the additive use of gender-neutral language in traditionally woman-centric movements.” I agree that use of exclusively gender-neutral language has at least potential to harm through erasure, but its additive use has clear potential to promote compassion and inclusion.

But I do question why it is so uncomfortable to have traditionally female-associated language transition into catch-all terms. When I was training, during a placement on the Intensive Care Unit, the senior nurse on the ward was a man. Senior nurses and midwives in the UK are often called Sister. Once, about to call him Sister, I caught myself and asked, “What should I call you?” Without hesitation, he said, “Call me Sister.” Then he told me off for wearing my jumper on the ward. My hesitation bothered me. But his professionalism and completely unthreatened acceptance of Sister as the gender-neutral term in the profession he had chosen impressed me. Male midwives have always done this. They are midwives.

What doesn’t impress me is when someone refers to a group containing both women and men as guys. This came up in a social media group for mothers who work in academia. Despite feedback from students voicing that it makes them uncomfortable, many people answered that guys is gender-neutral and, essentially, there are more important problems that require addressing so they were not going to go to the bother of changing their language. Guys will be gender neutral when it feels equally comfortable to refer to the same group or a group of men as gals. When taxi drivers no longer ask me if Shawn isn’t usually a guy’s nameMen was definitely neither gender- nor colour-neutral when the words “all men are created equal” sparked a revolution, and it still isn’t.

But it is very common, especially among male doctors, to refer to a group of midwives as girls, as in, “The girls will look after you …” It is incredibly tricky to challenge this language without being dismissed as an over-sensitive ranty feminist, the one with the problem, the one whose political correctness gets in the way of co-operating on more important problems. Yet if I do not change my own language in referring to birthing people primarily (but not exclusively) as mothers and women, I fear I will simultaneously be regarded as insensitive and possibly transphobic.

Some of my frustration also comes from years of being an ally in a different minority struggle. I would like every health care professional using predominantly gender neutral language in their practice to also normalise breech presentation. Every time you demonstrate the mechanisms of labour, do it with the baby coming out both ways. Always say, “Babies are born head-first or bottom-, knee- or foot-first.” Because they are, or they could be. I can’t tell you the number of times that people have said they would like to support breech birth, but it requires too much time and effort (see the “more important problems” excuse above).

Many professionals who hold the power to change things have even suggested that spending the extra time and/or resources it would require to ensure women who want to birth breech babies vaginally are attended by skilled, experienced professionals would be an unequal and thus unfair application of resources for such a small number of people (1:25-30 mothers at term carry a breech baby). Other rarer conditions, especially those which require expensive fancy-pants technology rather than more people-time, don’t seem to be affected by such arguments. In our over-stretched and over-aware maternity services, giving more to one seems to come at the cost of another.

I am genuinely grappling with the implications of the language I use, involving my family and colleagues in conversations, changing bits which feel right and remaining open to how my language may continue to change. I don’t feel there are “more important problems.” But I am not yet convinced that using exclusively gender-neutral language to ensure that a (non-woman) minority will not feel uncomfortable, will not mask another invisible injustice towards women. Inclusivity has to be both gender-acknowledging AND gender-neutral, rather than exclusively gender-neutral, until we know that losing gender specificity will do no harm to women. I am convinced by the research suggesting health professionals need to use more inclusive language and communicate with LGBTQIA+ families more sensitively and competently. I’ve seen no research assuring me that removing all gendered pronouns from the language around maternity care will do no harm to women. Until I am assured, I will continue to take an additive approach rather than an exclusively gender-neutral one.

For me, for now: More inclusive language is welcome, and in my work I will strive to include gender-neutral language alongside the gendered language that is embraced by the majority. I recognise that not everyone who gives birth is a woman, and I’m going to consciously use alternatives more often, just like I am consciously using people and folks where others are still using guys. When I do use women, especially in a group of parents, I am going to try to include other descriptors to acknowledge both women who want or need me to see the way their gender influences their experience, and people who need to know that I welcome them, and want to include and care for them, whatever their gender or lack of it.

And I hope that when inclusive birth professionals describe normal birth, they refer to the physiological birth of a baby who emerges spontaneously at term, head, bottom, feet or knees first, so that people who are pregnant with breech babies no longer feel they are abnormal or a freak for wanting to birth their breech babies. Just imagine what will happen when the families you teach attend their appointments expecting that they will give birth normally like everyone else, unless a genuine problem emerges! When I describe a person’s birth video, I am going to continue to describe them using the pronouns they use to describe themselves.

But I have a practical problem: I spend a lot of time talking about the way two pelvises interact with each other during a breech birth. I need to distinguish between the fetal/baby’s pelvis and the birthing person’s pelvis, and how they operate together as what the professionals in my research called the Mother-Baby Unit. Birther-Baby unit doesn’t feel right; it feels like I’ve separated the birthing body from the loving carer and sustenance-giver. Birthing is the ultimate reproductive act; but it is also a major bit of parenting. A time of being and becoming. Merriam-Webster‘s on-line dictionary tells me that the verb mother means “to give birth,” “to give rise to,” or “to care for or protect like a mother.” It feels right (to me) that mother itself has the potential to transition to gender-neutral. Not all of those who mother a child are women, nor do all women mother a child. (And not all people who father a child are men, nor do all men father a child.) I am asking those who wish for a more inclusive language to consider whether mother could be the mother of all inclusive terms. Such a concept may be just as radical as shifting gendered pronouns out of maternity services.

Folks, I am asking you to consider my use of mothering as a gender-neutral verb for giving birth, and to see such acceptance of maternal descriptors for the birth act as a radical act of solidarity with the women around you who remain a second sex. Women who have had to live with male descriptors being used as gender-neutral, but almost never vice versa, their entire lives. Women in every country of the world whose genders and embodied existences are immutably determined by others’ sexual (ab)use of them, women who are made to birth children against their will. Because no one should have to mother against their will. Mothering should always be a role one chooses, during pregnancy, birth and sometimes after. I’m remaining open to new possibilities as our language and culture shift. But for the moment, I ask you to be with me in considering the radicalism in mother-centred care, the importance of understanding women as a class of people despite infinite diversity within that group, and the need to explore and challenge the discomfort arising when descriptors historically associated with the female sex are used as gender-neutral terms in our brave new world. I in turn will recognise your radical acceptance and compromise, while I continue to check my inclusion of gender-neutral language.

I have shared my thoughts in good faith, wanting to do well by all I work with. I welcome you to comment here in order to help me and others continue learning and growing, but please as always, practice compassionate understanding in your response.


P.S. I am a Unitarian. But I love unisex-named medieval mystics, especially when they are mother enough to be challengingly gender-fluid the 14th century without a position statement, awesome enough to be the first woman to have her book published in the English language, and their own self enough to depict Jesus as the bad-ass Mother that he was, inclusive of caesarean section imagery (how did she know how important this would be?) Go Jules!

Accountant Needed!

Now that my PhD is submitted, I am in the process of registering Breech Birth Network as a Community Interest Company. This business structure will enable 1) the accounts to be separate from mine; 2) all of the profits to be channelled back into the breech training, research and advocacy work we do; and 3) accountability, as the annual financial report is publicly available.

I really need an accountant who is either experienced with all of the following or able and keen to become experienced:

  1. Filing individual UK tax returns
  2. Filing individual USA tax returns (I am required to do this)
  3. Filing Community Interest Company Tax returns in the UK
  4. Understanding the company’s obligations when earning revenue by providing training outside of the UK and helping us to meet them

Prayer hands – breech births make more sense to me than tax returns!

I need this to be one person; continuity of relationship is important to me. I would like to work with a person who feels great supporting what we are doing with Breech Birth Network. Maybe you/they feel passionately about the physiological breech cause for your/their own personal reasons, or have a general commitment to the advancement of human rights in childbirth and respectful maternity care.

Obviously, I am expecting to compensate such a person appropriately.

Do you know someone? Are you possibly this someone? PM if you are using the form below. Please help me find my tax angel so I can spend more time recording voiceover for training videos!