Tag Archives: physiological

Upcoming Indie Birth class

On 21 November 2017, I will be giving an on-line class through Indie Birth. The class takes place from 6-8 pm GMT, and you can enrol via the Indie Birth website.

The class will begin with a 20-minute training video for clinical skills trainers who want to incorporate physiological breech principles into their breech training. The video is my best attempt to compress a whole study day into a 20-minute refresher, which can precede a short hands-on session. It starts with a description of the mechanisms, then covers basic principles and the main manoeuvres to resolve complicated births when the mother is in an upright position. Manoeuvres are shown in short clips taken from various birth videos, and again in slow motion. I provide a voice-over throughout the film, helping you understand what you are seeing, and links the the research base which informs the Breech Birth Network training.

Even if you cannot attend the class in real time, you will receive a link to the recording with login information. This will enable you to use the video to share information and physiological breech skills with your colleagues.

Andrea Houle and Isabel Brabant teaching with Breech Birth Network and RSFQ in Montreal, Sept 2017

The on-line class will be interactive, with time for questions at the end. I’d love feedback about the video. Over the last year, I’ve been working closely with Academia Verloskunde Amsterdam Groningen (AVAG), the Association of Ontario Midwives (AOM), and the Regroupement Les Sage-Femmes du Quebec (RSFQ) to look at how they can teach more physiological breech methods, underpinned with an evidence base. I feel continually blessed to be able to learn what other midwives and obstetricians feel they need to learn and teach physiological breech. I hope that this video will eventually help clinical skills trainers to share the methods more widely, even in short update sessions.

If you are a clinical skills trainer, working in a health care facility, educational institution or midwifery/medical association, I’d love to hear from you. And we are always very grateful to the women and practitioners who share birth videos with us so that we can continue to learn and share this knowledge with others. The revolution in breech management now occurring is spreading largely because women, midwives and obstetricians have made visible practices that have previously been hidden behind closed doors. Openness, flexibility, collaboration.

Shawn

Breech in Belfast

Consultant Obstetricians Niamh McCabe and Janitha Costa, and Breech Specialist Midwife Jacqui Simpson

The Breech Birth Network visited Belfast this weekend. Dr Anke Reitter FRCOG of the Krankenhaus Sachsenhausen and I taught a day-long physiological breech study day at the Royal Victoria Hospital for over 40 obstetricians and midwives.

The day was organised by Consultant Obstetricians Janitha Costa and Niamh McCabe, enthusiastic upright physiological breech practitioners, and Senior Registrar Shaun McGowan. The team have recently published outcomes associated with their breech clinic (Hickland et al 2017 and Costa 2014).

Our study day increasingly emphasises pattern recognition and decision-making through the use of real breech birth videos, especially videos of complicated births. We watch, deliberate and critique – with compassionate understanding, respect and humble appreciation. These brave health professionals and women have allowed themselves to be vulnerable and exposed in order that others may learn, and we are very grateful.

We have also moved away from using heavy and expensive simulation models and rely instead on doll and pelvis models. These enable us to see what is happening from all angles and embed the theory of the manoeuvres we are teaching. We operate on a see one (the theoretical presentation), do one (hands-on with one of the instructors), teach one (of your colleagues) model. This helps build confidence to carry on teaching the techniques in the local setting.

Our preferred models (it’s a great idea to have some on hand if you are organising a study day or implementing this training in your local setting) are:

Fetal Doll Model; and

Cloth Pelvic Model; or

Female Pelvis Model

Final announcement: Blogging has resumed because … I submitted my PhD a couple weeks ago! Hurrah!

Shawn

Krankenhaus Sachsenhausen is also on Facebook!